Touring Bhutan

In Bhutan the tourism sector is the largest commercial source of convertible currency earnings. Perched on the snowlines of the Himalayas and isolated from the rest of the world for a long time, Bhutan opened its door to tourists in 1974. Often called the last Shangri-La, Bhutan today represents last of the Buddhist countrieswith a rich and pristine culture typical to the Buddhist culture.Government, with its policy of “high value and low volume”, restricts the number of visitors to only a few thousand tourists a year.

Bhutan has four distinct season, spring, monsoon, autumn and winter. Spring and autumn is the best time to visit Bhutan i.e. end of Febraury till end of March and September to November. If you love flowers, you will get plenty of them in May, June and July. November, December, January and February will be blessed with breath taking mountain views, sunny days and the morning/evening chills.

Trekking: The scope for trekking in Bhutan is immense - from short walks to 4 day treks (highest altitude reached 4090m/12,726ft) to the arduous Snowman trek (highest altitude reached 5345m/17,532ft). The very moment you step off the road to start your trek you will be totally de-linked from the stressful sights and sounds of urban life. Instead, you will enjoy views of snowcapped peaks, dense forested hillsides and river valleys, and the sounds of birds and gushing streams, flowing down to the temperate river valleys from the melting snows of the mighty Himalayan peaks. Trekking provides an excellent opportunity to experience the real heart of Bhutan and gain insight into the rural culture of the kingdom.

Cultural Tours: Cultural tours introduce visitors to unique aspects of Mahayana Buddhist culture, including visits to religious festivals, dzongs (fortresses), temples, and village excursions. All tours provide a closer look at a culture and a land which remains the most unspoiled and beautiful example of the traditional Himalayan way of life in existence today. Cultural tours of western Bhutan can be done in 3-7 days, whereas central and eastern Bhutan tours would take longer, 8-10 days and 11-13 days respectively.

Bird Watching: Nowhere else in the Himalayas can one find such diversity and richness in the bird life. In just a few minutes hoursdrive one can cover temperature regions to the sub-tropics . Without having to stray too far off the roads you can spot countless varieties of bird life.It is not a question of how much one can see, but rather how much time do you have to see the many.

Botanical Tours: With over 65% forest cover, and more than 25% of the country designated as national Parks, plant life is preserved like no other country in the world. The extreme changes in altitude provide a breathtaking aray of flora.

Fly Fishing: Mountain lakes, streams and river in Bhutan provide an excellent opportunity for fly fishing. Tour or trek this magical kingdomwhile indulging in your favourite sport, with trained fly fishing guides, and find yourself in some of the most spectacular settings.

Festivals: Every locality in Bhutan takes pride in organizing a Tsechu which is a festival in honor of Guru Padmasambhava. This lasts anywhere from one day to a week. A time of celebration and an opportunity for the women to wear their splendid and woven dresses, for the men to meet socially. Monks perform prayer ceremonies that continue day and night, while the majorities come to witness the mask dances and folk dances that are performed. The big Tsechus of Thimphu, ParoWangduephodrang ,Trongsa , Bumthang , Mongar& Tashigang attract large local crowd. There are numerous other village festivals that have a small intimate crowd.

Mountain Biking: Bhutan has the perfect roads and the environment for biking. You can cover the entire country west to east on roads that are free of traffic and pollution . Enjoy the scenery without having to whizz by in a tour bus.